The Witch’s Kind – Review

The Witch’s Kind by Louisa Morgan

Rating: ★★★★★

Goodreads | Amazon

Publication Date: March 19, 2019

Genres: Historical Fiction, Paranormal, Fantasy


Thank you to Redhook Books, NetGalley, and Louisa Morgan for allowing me to read an ARC of the truly wonderful book. This is my 100% honest opinion and review of The Witch’s Kind.

The Witch’s Kind will be published on March 19th of this year, available on Kindle and in a hardcopy format.


“Barrie Anne Blythe and her aunt Charlotte have always known that to the public eye they look peculiar — two women living alone on the outskirts of town. But that is the price they are willing to pay for concealing their strange family secret. When Barrie Anne finds a mysterious abandoned baby with a hint of power like their own, she knows that it was meant to be. But when her long-lost husband suddenly reappears, Barrie knows that he is not the man she thought she married. Barrie Anne and Charlotte must decide how far they are willing to go to protect themselves and the child they now call their own from suspicious neighbors and the government.”


This mid-19th-century book with a mix of paranormal, government conspiracy, and strong feminism is exactly what I was looking for this month.

Barrie Anne and her aunt Charlotte are wonderful characters that carry the story, and at times, their goodness and their bond truly break your heart with happiness at times; showing that not all families look like the nuclear family image. Through the talent that they call “a touch of water magic” that has traveled down generations of Blythe women, Barrie and Charlotte are able to receive premonitions or feelings of what is to come. But, in the late 1940s, they are careful to keep their knowledge well hidden from their neighbors, in fear of what might happen if someone were to find out.

The two strong female characters who are the main characters of the book are inspiring and have a powerful dynamic and bond that is thrilling to experience. The way that females are represented in The Witch’s Kind is powerful and creates an air of mystic and realness surrounding them. Their personalities are as extremely diverse as people are in real life, making the story come to life even more. Louisa Morgan’s grasp on characters, their depths, and what people are truly like then putting that on paper is unbelievably magnificent, and at points, it truly takes the readers breath away. Parts of the book had me on the very edge of my seat and I greedily gulped the words down, not wanting to miss a second of the action.

The way that females are represented in The Witch’s Kind is powerful and creates an air of mystic and realness surrounding them. Their personalities are as extremely diverse as people are in real life, making the story come to life even more. Louisa Morgan’s grasp on characters, their depths, and what people are truly like then putting that on paper is unbelievably magnificent, and at points, it truly takes the readers breath away. Parts of the book had me on the very edge of my seat and I greedily gulped the words down, not wanting to miss a second of the action.

Barrie Anne who, while growing up, struggled with never fitting in with her friends’ nuclear family, yearned for one of her own. While in college, she met the charming Will Sweet and the two quickly fell in love, marrying before he left to fight in the war. After he returns, Barrie Anne quickly comes to realize that he is not who she thought.

Morgan’s writing in The Witch’s Kind quickly carries the reader away, even makes them forget that they are reading. I flew through this book in under a week, and actually had to pace myself because I wanted to savor the story. With a keen sense of humor, her writing was completely enjoyable and easy to read.

The story has such heartfelt emotions and really sheds a light on what it was like to have lived as a woman who was free of a man or as a member of the LGTBQ+ community after WW2. It also appeals to the fascination of conspiracies that circled the government during that time, with Roswell and UFO sightings, which left the book with an air of mystery and suspense.


I highly recommend reading this book to anyone, even if you are hesitant about it. I also recommend reading Morgan’s book A Secret History of Witch’s which was published in 2017, which I can’t wait to read for myself.


Thank you once more to Redhook Books publishing company and NetGalley for allowing me to read this wonderfully crafted book.



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Thank you so much for reading my review! This is 100% my opinion and not sponsored in any type of way. 


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I'm an avid reader who can't get her nose out of a book. I am an English undergraduate student in the Midwest who dreams of being an author one day.

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